2017 - It’s the Summer of Love and Abstraction at the Cape Cod Museum of Art!

June 29, 2017

Marking the 50th anniversary of the Summer of 1967 that ushered in a countercultural fervor throughout the country, CCMoA exhibitions illuminate the Abstract Art movements that broke the conventions of Realism and led to new artistic expressions in the 1960s. The Summer of Love Annual Auction Gala will bring back sights and sounds of that 1967 summer of celebration.  ‘….be sure to wear flowers in your hair.’

 

Dan Welden: Innovations in Printmaking

This exhibition highlights Welden’s large-scale hybrid abstract prints created with his own environmentally-safe Solarplate process which eliminates harmful chemicals – he uses the Sun! 

June 29 - August 11, 2017

 

International Masters: Collaborations in Printmaking  

 An exhibition of lithographs and mixed-media prints, created collaboratively with Dan Welden as Master Printer.  These are images by other well-known artists, including Willem de Kooning, Elaine de Kooning, Eric Fischl, and David Salle.

July 13 – Sept 17, 2017 - Exhibition Still Open

 

My favorite thought of Picasso’s is that when you look at abstract art you don’t need to ‘understand’ what it is, just as you don’t need to understand the singing of a bird or the notes of music, to love it. – Dan Welden

 

“We are very excited to present Dan Welden, an internationally renowned Master Printmaker, innovator and teacher, with two exhibitions and a workshop during our celebration of “The Summer of Love and Abstraction” this year,” said Edith (Deede) Tonelli, Director of Cape Cod Museum of Art (CCMoA).

 

Marking the 50th anniversary of the Summer of 1967 that ushered in a countercultural fervor throughout the country, several CCMoA’s exhibitions illuminate the Abstract Art movements that broke the conventions of Realism and led to new artistic expressions throughout the 1960s.

 

Creating prints and works on paper for 50 years and appearing in over 700 shows, Welden has been in the forefront of abstract art – interpreting landscapes through rhythmic lines, shapes and forms.  Much of his work is in the mixed media of etching, drawing and painting.

 

He is also a leader in the alternative health and safety oriented movement in printmaking.  As the originator of a technique called Solarplate printing, which uses the sun to process images, he has eliminated the need for toxic chemicals.  He is co-author of “Printmaking in the Sun.” Welden will discuss his work in open conversation with Dr. Kathleen Collins and present a short film on this groundbreaking process on July 6 and conduct a two-day hands-on workshop at the Museum on July 7th and 8th.

 

Originally a representational artist, Welden initially rejected abstract art – until he had a moment of inspiration.  High In the mountains of Norway, eating blueberries in the rain, he looked down to see a meandering waterway.  He saw that it took the form of a negative curving line.  “All my senses kicked in and the overpowering feeling to understand and create that vision became my work,” Welden said.  The inspiration of nature and love of line still drives the passion that he expresses in his work today.

 

“It took me a long time to fully understand that abstract art is an expression of being,” Welden said.  “When you look at abstract art you don’t need to ‘understand’ what it is, just as you don’t need to understand the singing of a bird or the notes of music, to love it. “

 

At his Sag Harbor printmaking studio, Welden has collaborated with internationally-known artists to produce original prints, including: Lynda Benglis, James Brooks, Willem and Elaine de Kooning, Jimmy Ernst, Eric Fischl, Dan Flavin, Jane Freilicher, William King, Ibram Lassaw, Roy Nicholson, David Salle, Kurt Vonnegut, Jack Youngerman and many others.  

 

Cecilia Rossey, an outstanding Cape-based printmaker who is an instructor at CCMoA, has studied with Welden says, “Dan's love for his art form is contagious.  He exudes this love through his work, demos, and discussions, and always has a great story.   I consider him a treasure because he not only is a great artist but he altered the world of printmaking by developing the Solarplate process, doing away with acids and solvents while attempting to keep printmakers healthy, and respecting the environment.  It changed my life as a printmaker and teacher as I employ the non-toxic methods.” 

 

 

 

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