LOST AND FOUND:
TIME, TIDE, AND TREASURES

 

October 7, 2021 - January 2, 2022

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Based on the book by the same name, this exhibition presents the work of six artists/beachcombers connected to Provincetown and each other who have collected treasures from the beaches of Provincetown and used them for inspiration in making their art. Some of the collections are on display, as well.

Read a review of the book in

Cape Cod Arts

Listen to August 2020 interview  with Amy Heller, Gail Browne and Paul Bowen on THE POINT with Mindy Todd

WCAI Interview

This exhibition is dedicated to our friend, fellow artist and beachcomber,

Varujan Boghosian (1926-2020)

- Amy Heller and Gail Browne, co-curators

WATCH THE PANEL DISCUSSION FROM
Thursday, October 7, 2021 • 5:30 - 7:30 PM

Grace Hopkins, moderator
Gail Browne, Amy Heller, Paul Bowen and Betty Bodian

Exhibition
Preview

 
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Amy Heller

A native of Washington, DC, artist Amy Heller has been coming to Provincetown every summer since

she was a child, walking and combing the beaches with her mother. Amy earned her BA in fine art at Hampshire College in Amherst, Massachusetts, and her MFA in photography at George Washington University in Washington, DC. She has been an exhibit specialist for the Smithsonian Museums and the National Gallery of Art, and a photo editor/researcher/curator for US News & World Report, National Geographic, Microsoft, and the Newseum in Washington, DC. She lives year-round on Cape Cod with

her husband.

 

Drawn to the natural world, she finds beauty and grace in the simplest discoveries: intertwining seaweeds, dancing skate egg cases, sand patterns, lyrical forms of sand and sea. Recently she has been making LED mixed-media cyanotype photographs on fabric, inspired by the blue sky, using figures resembling skate egg cases and, in some artworks, using the actual egg cases. Her work is included in collections both here and abroad, including the Provincetown Art Association and Museum, the Cape Cod Museum of Art in Dennis, the Dimock Gallery at George Washington University, and many private collections.

Gail Browne

Gail Browne was born in Lakewood, Ohio, into a family of artists. Studying at the Cleveland Institute of Art, in 1966 she began spending her summers painting and working in Provincetown. After receiving her BFA in 1970, she moved to Provincetown permanently and began her career as a beachcomber.

 

“I believe that my lifelong painting experience has sharpened my eye to catch the slightest differences in shape and color. From initially painting the landscape to externalizing the emotional impact of a nuance, for me the fading wharves are not unlike intimate places of worship. Today they exist as sculptural icons, bare bones of a culture that built Provincetown. At their roots lie the spoils. Meandering among them, transported across the spectrum of time, the wharves serve as inspiration and stand as cathedrals to the spirit of Provincetown.”

Judy Berkowitz

As a college student and free spirit, Judy Berkowitz migrated from the East Village in New York City in the 1960s and lived for a brief time in a shack in the woods of Tasha Hill in Provincetown. After graduating from City College of New York, Judy opened a store in the East Village called Opening Line, featuring her one-of-a-kind clothing designs. Her circle of friends in the Village included some now-famous artists and musicians. Memories of fishing nets and ropes found their way into her creations. Obligations kept her from Provincetown until 1991, when she started revisiting Provincetown as often as she could. These visits would take her to the boatyards, where she scavenged anything nautical.

 

Judy has repurposed some of the objects from her collection. The most unusual piece was made from saw blades and other jetsam and resembled a pot of flowers. She entered it into a Provincetown Art Association and Museum (PAAM) show, where it made the catalog cover. Her collected objects include fishing baskets, wooden oars and oarlocks, old bones, nails, paintbrushes, metal objects, and colored rope.

Paul Bowen

Born in Wales, Paul Bowen grew up by the sea. He studied at the Chester School of Art in Chester, England; Newport College of Art in Newport, Wales; and the Maryland Institute College of Art in Baltimore. His work is in collections here and abroad, including the Museum of Fine Arts, Boston; the Solomon Guggenheim Museum, New York City; the Walker Art Center, Minneapolis; Provincetown Art Association and Museum; and the Cape Cod Museum of Art, Dennis. He is represented by the Albert Merola Gallery in Provincetown and the Big Town Gallery in Rochester, Vermont.

 

He is a natural-born beachcomber and readily admits to being addicted to the search. He has a large collection of shards, pipes, pipestems, bottles, and other objects of daily life, but they do not physically appear in his work but inform his aesthetic. Wooden boatbuilding fragments define Paul’s language of form and purpose by reflecting the past, and he uses the salvaged wood he collects in his sculptures. He lived in Provincetown for over three decades and now resides in Vermont with his wife.

Betty Bodian

Betty Bodian lives in NYC and was born in Newark, New Jersey.  She attended the High School of Music and Art in New York City and studied fashion and design at Cooper Union. Betty’s history with Provincetown spans over sixty years. She arrived in 1953 and met her future husband, Al. She has an impressive beachcombing collection, and her paintings are inspired by the sea and the transparency of the bottles that she finds. She was a member of the Group Gallery in Provincetown, the Atlantic Gallery in SoHo, and more, and her work is in the permanent collection at the Cape Cod Museum of Art, the Provincetown Art Association and Museum, and private collections.

Varujan Boghosian

“Sculptor, assembler, constructionist, builder – beachcomber, scavenger, collector, historian, conservator,” Varujan Boghosian (1926 New Britain, Connecticut - September 21, 2020) attended Yale University and had been a Fulbright scholar, as well as artist-in-residence at the American Academy in Rome, and a Guggenheim Fellow. He taught art for many years, most recently at Dartmouth College, and lived in New Hampshire. Varujan’s work is exhibited at the Berta Walker Gallery in Provincetown and Wellfleet, and at the Kent Gallery in NYC. His work has been exhibited nationally and internationally and is in permanent collections at the Metropolitan Museum of Art, the Museum of Modern Art, the Whitney Museum of Art, the Cape Cod Museum of Art, and the Provincetown Art Association and Museum. “He gathers the relics of our common experience, and transformed by imagination, they become poetic tributes, homages to the universal limitless creative spirit.”

The Artists / Beachcombers